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Wellness

One of the most common questions we get is whether to use heat or ice for an injury. Both are beneficial when used properly, but the best option depends on what type of injury you’ve incurred. When to use ice Ice is the best option for an injury that is less than twenty-four hours old. Ice causes the blood vessels to narrow, which reduces inflammation. Cold packs are commonly used to reduce pain with sprains and bruises. To avoid frostbite, place a towel between your injury and the cold pack, in twenty minute intervals. More cold time does not equal… Read more...

Orgasmically Challenged???

Monday, 15 July 2013 05:31
If you’re a woman who has noticed persistent, recurrent problems with sexual response or desire that distresses you or strains your relationship with your partner, you are suffering from female sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction includes desire, arousal, orgasmic, and sexual pain disorders. Forty-three percent of women (versus thirty-one percent of men) are effected by sexual dysfunction. Fortunately, most cases of female sexual dysfunction are treatable, so it is important to share your concerns with your partner and your health care provider.  Source: Grand Rapids OB/GYN Read more...
With temperatures soaring this summer, it's common for people to be concerned about the dangers of heat exhaustion and dehydration. But another killer lurks in the sun’s rays, in the form of ultraviolet (UV) radiation.   Everyone is exposed to naturally occurring solar UV radiation. However, with the increasing trends of sunbathing and tanning beds among young adults and women, a tanned appearance has become a misguided sign of a good look and good health. Additionally, studies have shown that many adults and adolescents in the U.S. do not regularly protect themselves when outdoors on sunny days.   July is UV… Read more...
Although you can’t always avoid every hot flash or night sweat, you can help reduce their severity and their frequency by knowing the five most common triggers: Hormone changes, especially low or dropping estrogen. Alcohol. Sugar (from treats like ice cream, cookies, or sugar-laced tea) before bed. Stressful thoughts or worries about tasks not completed. Caffeine, especially without adequate water for several days. Learn more about midlife health and menopause at spectrumhealthblog.org/menopause. Dr. Diana Bitner blogs weekly about symptoms, treatments, and her own life stories about perimenopause. Written by: Diana Bitner, MD, Menopause Specialist, Spectrum Health Medical Group Photo: stock.xchng Read more...
It’s no wonder nearly one in ten Americans suffers from depression. “Top risk factors include being unable to work or being unemployed, having no health insurance, and suffering from obesity,” notes psychologist Gregory L. Jantz, citing a Centers for Disease Control study. “Unfortunately, those topics have dominated headlines for the past five years. What’s worse, by 2020, the World Health Organization estimates depression will be second most debilitating disease worldwide.”  The author of Overcoming Anxiety, Worry and Fear says these negative emotions, along with sustained, excessive stress, can lead to depression, which now overshadows other problems for which patients seek help at his… Read more...
These days, it feels as though everything is a race: A race to get all the boxes on your to-do list checked off. A race to make it to the next rung of the professional ladder. A race to keep up with and perhaps even beat out “the Joneses.” A race to make sure your children have the perfect academic, extracurricular, and personal qualifications so that they can get into a good college. A race to make sure all of the bills get paid, even though you’re on a reduced budget.            However, instead of building… Read more...

Summer Fun Without the Pain

Friday, 24 May 2013 13:32
After what seemed like a terribly long winter, many of us wasted no time heading outside to fix up the yard and soak up some sun, once warmer weather finally hit. While it certainly feels good to be doing projects outdoors, it’s important to remember how to do these tasks properly, so your body doesn’t pay for it later. How many times have you overexerted yourself doing yard work, only to wake up the next day with back pain and sore muscles?  As a physical therapist and expert in body mechanics, I see many patients come in with sprains and… Read more...
A not so surprising new study shows stress reduces the effectiveness of drugs used for prostate cancer, and even accelerates the disease’s development. “More than one hundred fifty million Americans will be diagnosed with cancer this year, and how they deal with it can have a dramatic effect on their physical and emotional health,” said pioneering cancer psychotherapist Dr. Niki Barr, author of Emotional Wellness: The Other Half of Treating Cancer. While the mind/body connection in fighting disease is well-documented, the new study by Wake Forest Baptist Medical Centers reveals just how damaging anxiety and stress can be, Dr. Barr… Read more...

Arthritis Awareness Month

Tuesday, 14 May 2013 09:43
This article was done in conjunction with a partnership with BCBSM's A Healthier Michigan.  Every May marks Arthritis Awareness month. Arthritis is generally a rather broad ailment and disease; however, it is also a mostly invisible disease. In other words, most arthritis sufferers look healthy on the outside, or look too young, or what have you. Though many types of arthritis afflict more than fifty million Americans, the disease itself is misunderstood in many ways. In honor of Arthritis Awareness Month, it’s important to separate the myths from the facts and learn of the resources available to not only educate yourself,… Read more...
This scenario sound familiar? You're at a get together with girlfriends, in the midst of the typical bouts of laughter that usually accompany events such as these, when: "Oops, I think I just peed a little ..." Laughter could quickly turn to embarrassment  when it’s accompanied by a little urinary leakage. Did it start happening to you after you had your baby, as you got older, or after surgery? You are not alone: Urinary incontinence affects millions of women of all ages, not just the elderly. Urinary incontinence is the leakage of urine at inappropriate times. You may have trouble… Read more...