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A Community for the Influential & Professional Woman

Financial

The current economic and market environment has prompted many Americans to rethink their retirement strategies. If you are experiencing a job transition—particularly if the transition is unplanned and unexpected—such a reassessment may be particularly important for you. While it may be tempting to focus more on your immediate needs, you should not lose sight of long-term goals, especially your retirement strategy.  Some Basic Decisions  Your employer-sponsored retirement plan is likely to be a key component of your retirement strategy. Because it represents a key source of future retirement income, it is important to carefully consider your alternatives for administering these… Read more...

Your Financial Life Stages

Tuesday, 23 July 2013 00:00
Investors have many difficult decisions to make, in each stage of their lives, and every financial decision is based on your virtues. You must do what is best for your family throughout all of your and their financial life’s stages. The first financial life stage is the Learning Stage. Before graduation from school, children typically go to their parents to seek financial advice on topics such as how much to save and spend their first paychecks, where to invest, what credit card to get, what life insurance or disability to purchase, how to invest their employer’s retirement plan, how to… Read more...

Can Money Buy Happiness?

Tuesday, 16 July 2013 00:00
I do not believe there is a direct correlation between money and happiness. Some of the richest people in the world are not happy; they can never have enough. Some of the happiest people are those who follow their calling and do not have a dollar to their name. However, the book Happy Money, The Science of Smarter Spending gives some sound advice based on research on ways you can use money to help create happiness in your life.   We all think we know how to spend our money in ways that create happiness in our lives—but do we… Read more...
One of the hardest things for a financial advisor (and/or financial planner) to articulate is his or her value. So much of what a financial advisor does is based on how he or she invests your money, but at that same time, there are many other areas where an advisor adds value outside of the performance of your investments.   In investing, there are terms like Alpha and Beta to measure value. Alpha is the measure of risk-adjusted performance of an investment compared to its benchmark. For example, if the S&P 500 had a performance of ten percent, a large… Read more...
Have you heard about the massive amount of money investors lost due to the Madoff Ponzi scheme? There sadly are so many more scandals and schemes alive and doing well in the financial area.   Historically, however, investors who follow these ten simple rules have not experienced scandals or Ponzi schemes: Be involved! Receive, read, and understand your portfolio statement in order to monitor your account. Ask questions of your advisor if there is any activity you do not understand.  Never allow any of your portfolio statements to be sent to anyone else, especially only to your advisor. Request distributions from… Read more...
For many investors, the top retirement goal is total financial freedom with a certain income level. The income goal for one investor might be considered excess income by another. The amount you need is not what matters, as the basics are the same.  Ladies, you must be involved in all phases of retirement planning. Statistically, the woman will outlive her male spouse; therefore, women are likely to benefit the most from this planning. It is very important that your dreams and wishes be known, discussed, and planned for, so you will have no regrets in the future.  Once you become… Read more...

STOP Moving Your Money … FOREVER

Tuesday, 11 June 2013 00:00
Bert worked for one of the large Detroit automobile companies for many years and had a retirement plan with some very expensive no-load investment options. Every Monday, Bert checked in with his office peers and then adjusted his employer’s retirement account, moving his investment allocations according to what the market did the week before and what his peers projected the market would do in the future. Bert was his own worst enemy! He listened to his peers and moved his retirement money frequently. That was, until he attended Free Market classes. There he learned that each time you change your… Read more...
For thirteen years, we taught investment classes for a college and various local community education programs. Many students were highly educated—successful business owners, mid- to high-level corporate managers, doctors, lawyers, MBAs, nurses, technicians, schoolteachers, retirees, and homemakers, all seeking to learn about the successful way to invest. Now we teach at conferences, workshops, churches, and businesses, and continue to enjoy the student interaction.  We ask our students, “Has anyone ever explained to you how to invest simply and stress-free using the Free Market philosophy?” Few have ever heard of our investing philosophy. Why not? What incentive does the financial world… Read more...
I (Maria) am the type of person who feels secure when I’m in control and well informed. When working as a biomedical photographer, before I started a new career as a Wealth Coach with my mother, I’d read my employers’ 401(k) investment prospectuses, and then believed I could make an informed investment decision. I frequently logged into my 401(k) account to check my investments and then made changes to my allocations, because of their past returns. I never realized how much I was actually hurting my investments. My behavior caused these results: My 401(k) was poorly diversified; I created larger investment… Read more...

Test Drive Your Retirement Dreams

Tuesday, 14 May 2013 00:00
Karl and Jenny retired and sold their home to move to a warmer climate. They were looking forward to full-time fishing, golfing, and gardening, as their new southern home was near a lake and on a golf course.  Two years after their move, they called us to help them figure out how to repurchase their previous home—the same home they had left behind in southeast Michigan. They wanted to move back. They missed their children and grandchildren and decided that family was more important to them than year-round warm weather and hobbies. Unfortunately, they could not buy back their old… Read more...
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